When he awakens, the narrator empties the two remaining barrels, to no effect, replaces the dirt, and finds that the strange fungus has turned to harmless ash. Phosphorescent white fungi grew from the dirt floor, and strange mold grew on the hearthstone. But vampires in Rhode Island?

But the basement was worst, even though it was above ground on the street side, with a door offering quick egress. Each story is taken from a different period in time, yet they combine with one another to reveal the house's dark past to a journalist specialising in the paranormal and his sceptic girlfriend. Its yard was alluringly spooky, with weirdly pale grass, gnarled trees and a singular lack of birds. As he wrote in a letter: The French is an interesting touch. Summary The Shunned House "The Shunned House" is a novelette by H. P. Lovecraft in the horror fiction genre. The narrator's uncle has collected information from various sources and as the narrator goes through them he is also fascinated by it. Mythobabble? When Dr. Whipple naps, he tosses and turns and starts babbling in French until he suddenly awakes.
Narrator visits the basement at night. Its yard was alluringly spooky, with weirdly pale grass, gnarled trees and a singular lack of birds. He orders a military gas mask, digging tools, and six carboys of sulfuric acid to be delivered to the cellar door of the house.

“Those fungi, grotesquely like the vegetation in the yard outside, were truly horrible in their outlines; detestable parodies of toadstools and Indian pipes, whose like we had never seen in any other situation. sure, not HPL's best by a long shot but not bad either.

The narrator's uncle has collected information from various sources and as the narrator goes through them he is also fascinated by it. The narrator returns the next day to find his equipment intact, but no body. Daemons and houses a concoction for a tale of terror from thee master Lovecraft. Especially if he’s merely a conduit for something from beyond. As he wrote in a letter: This location is at present the site of a plaza named in honor of Winfield Scott, who was the namesake of Lo… If you haven’t yet declaimed the section starting with “scientific study and reflection had taught us” in a loud voice, followed by a mad cackle, I highly encourage you to do so. Whipple’s death is genuinely scary, and his shifting face at the last suggests that the creature sucks not merely life, but identity, from its victims. I'll be more careful next time. In the end, uncle Whipple aside, all’s well in Providence, and we get a lovely denouement in which the gnarled trees bear sweet apples and the birds return to their boughs to nest. When the narrator sleeps, he is awakened by a horrific scream. I would not recommend this edition to anyone, to be honest when I purchased it from Amazon I didn't read in detail how the edition would be, and when it arrived I was very confused. But the story starts with an intriguing observation about horror and irony—that goes exactly nowhere unless the latter part of the story is ironic in some way I’m missing—and continues with, not merely a story told through someone else’s letters and documents, but through someone else’s genealogy. The name Roulet tweaks narrator’s memory. A scream wakes him to greater horror. The Shunned House of the title is based on an actual house in Providence, Rhode Island, built around 1763 and still standing at 135 Benefit Street. Supernatural causes for the sickness of the house are implied—it’s poisoned by an evil revenant or undead sorcerer, on whose unhallowed grave it stands.

They don’t believe in vampires or werewolves per se, but speculate about “modifications of vital force or attenuated matter” which may manifest in earthly dimensions and feed upon the vital forces of humans and, presumably, other animals.